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Academic Integrity Policy

Classification number ACD 1509
Framework category Academic
Approving authority Academic Council
Policy owner Vice-President, Academic and Provost
Approval date November 24, 2020
Review date November 2023
Supersedes Academic Conduct and Professional Suitability Policy (Undergraduate) (Editorial Amendments, February 26, 2019; Approved May 18, 2018)

Preamble

The teaching and learning relationship is central to the education mandate of the University. This relationship relies on honesty, fairness, and mutual respect for the aims and principles of the pursuit of education. All University Members share a responsibility to maintain the integrity of this relationship through adherence to and promotion of the fundamental values of Academic Integrity: honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility, and courage (https://www.academicintegrity.org/fundamental-values/).

“Academic Integrity” refers to honest and ethical behaviours in the pursuit of research, education, and scholarly activities. The University promotes a culture based on the fundamental values of Academic Integrity that is sustained by a balance between:

  • Education about the values and behaviours consistent with Academic Integrity; and,
  • The disciplinary measures necessary for those who violate its fundamental values through breaches of Academic Integrity.

Academic Misconduct undermines academic integrity, the goals and principles of education, good scholarship, damages the teaching and learning relationship, disrupts the activities of the University, and compromises external relations with the broader community (e.g., internships, placements).

Where a breach of Academic Integrity is suspected, the University must treat the matter with a level of seriousness that reflects the importance attached to academic honesty and integrity at all universities. In the interest of protecting the fundamental values of Academic Integrity, students who exhibit behaviours contrary to the standards of Academic Integrity will be disciplined in accordance with this Policy and its related Procedures.

This Policy and the related Procedures ensure the rights and fair treatment of all University Members regarding the response to suspected acts of Academic Misconduct.

Purpose

The purpose of the Academic Integrity Policy is to establish, encourage and protect the ethical principles and conditions required for authentic and meaningful education, scholarship, and research.

Definitions

For the purposes of this Policy the following definitions apply:

“Academic Dishonesty” refers to any act or omission occurring in or as part of a course that violates academic integrity standards. These dishonest or negligent acts result or could result in an advantage to the student alleged to have committed the misconduct or to someone who directly obtains an unearned academic advantage as a result of the conduct of the student.

“Academic Integrity” refers to honest and ethical behaviour in the pursuit of research, education, and scholarship. It is based in the fundamental values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect, responsibility, and courage.

“Academic Integrity Committee” refers to a committee appointed to review allegations submitted for formal resolution. The Faculty-based committee consists of a representative of the Dean or Registrar and a minimum two (2) members of the Academic Staff. Where the Respondent is a graduate student, the two (2) members will be Graduate Academic Staff.

“Academic Misconduct” refers to activities, that may or may not be associated with a specific course, that violate the principles of Academic Integrity defined in this Policy.

“Academic Staff” refers to an individual holding an appointment as a faculty member, teaching faculty member, or sessional/part-time instructor.

“Academic Work” refers to any task assigned by a course Instructor for the purposes of evaluation and/or feedback, including but not limited to research, examinations, and coursework including drafts.

“Allegation” refers to an unsubstantiated report or complaint to be investigated of behaviour that is contrary to the fundamental values or standards of Academic Integrity.

“Applicant” means an individual who has submitted an application for admission to the University.

“Working Day” means any day, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, statutory holidays, and university closures, on which business can be conducted.

“Cheating” refers to obtaining an unfair advantage in any coursework requiring submission or completion for assessment purposes. This also includes resubmitting work previously assessed in another course.

“Collusion” involves people (e.g., 2 or more) working together on academic/coursework that has been clearly restricted to an individual (e.g., noted in the assignment instructions, course syllabus) for purposes of submission and grading. This may involve other Ontario Tech students or anyone external to the University.

“Contract Cheating” refers to students having others, either paid or unpaid, to complete their coursework. This may include but not limited to purchasing essays or other written work (e.g.,, lab reports, assignments, technical reports, theses, dissertations).

“Course Instructor” refers to the individual assigned to teach a course, including Research Supervisors.

“Coursework” refers to written, oral, or practical work completed by a student during a course for purposes of assessment and achieving a grade or final mark.

“Evidence” means any information gathered to establish the facts of alleged cases of Academic Misconduct. This information may include, but is not limited to, the work submitted by the student for assessment, original source of information (e.g., plagiarized work), any communication related to the student’s work, as well as any documentation communicating the University Policy on academic integrity.

“Examination” refers to a formal form of testing to assess the level of Students’ knowledge, ability, skills, comprehension, application, analysis, and/or synthesis of the subject matter in a course of study. This includes, but is not limited to in-person, online, take-home, practical, and laboratory activities.

“Honesty” means a refusal to lie or cheat in any way.

“Learning Management System” refers to web-based technology platform used to deliver online or e-learning.

“Policy” refers to the Academic Integrity Policy.

“Procedural Irregularity” refers to an unfair or improper application of this Policy.

“Research Supervisor” means the Academic Staff appointed to guide an undergraduate, graduate, or post-doctoral student through research related to a thesis, dissertation, or other research project.

“Scholarly Activities” refers to any work or product, in any form, submitted as part of a credit or non-credit course, projects, essays, labs, field trips, theses, dissertations, practicums, internships, or placements.

“Student” refers to any of the following: a person who has applied for admission to the University; any individual currently enrolled in any course (credit or non-credit) or program of study, including undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate, a visiting, exchange, or special audit student admitted for purposes of taking a course or conducting research, or anyone who was registered as a student at the time of the alleged act of Academic Misconduct.

“Suspension” means a time-limited sanction where a Student may not register, and loses the right to attend lectures, write Examinations, and receive payment from University sources. Courses taken elsewhere during the period of suspension are not eligible for transfer credit.

“University Member” means any individual who is:

  • Employed by the University;
  • Registered as a student, in accordance with the academic regulations of the University;
  • Holding an appointment with the University, including paid, unpaid, and/or honorific appointments; and/or
  • Is otherwise subject to University policies by virtue of the requirements of a specific policy (e.g., Booking and Use of University Space) and/or the terms of an agreement or contract.

“Unfair Advantage” refers to a situation that may result in a student gaining an unearned or unfair benefit in their academic matters, such as their academic work, academic record, or academic progress.

Scope and Authority

This Policy applies to conduct, Academic Work, and documentation submitted to the University by all current and Former Students.

Applicants to the University are subject to this policy. Dishonesty in an application to the University is considered an act of Academic Misconduct.

Former Students whose actions facilitate an act of Academic Misconduct in current Students are subject to review and possible sanctions under this Policy.

This Policy applies to conduct that may occur on the University campuses and online as well as conduct not on a University campus but that has a real and substantial academic connection to the University (e.g., practicum placements, internships, field trips, etc.)

Where a Student’s conduct in an incident includes behaviours that are both academic and non-academic in nature, the Student may be subject to disciplinary procedures under related policies, including the Student Conduct Policy. In this circumstance, a single disciplinary process will be invoked that will cover the resolution of both the academic and non-academic behaviours.

This Policy also applies to any institutions federated or affiliated with the University, where the University and the institution in question, with respect to the premises, facilities, equipment, services, activities, Students, and other members, have agreed upon such inclusion.

A lack of familiarity with the University’s Policy and related Procedures on Academic Integrity and Academic Misconduct on the part of the Student does not constitute a defence against its application.

All Students are responsible for their actions and for clarifying expectations with their Course Instructor or Faculty where they are uncertain.

Students are expected to complete Academic Work individually unless the instructor indicates otherwise.

Research Responsibilities

  1. Students at any level of study taking part in independent or guided research, whether for academic or non-academic purposes, are also responsible for familiarizing themselves with and adhering to the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship policy and related policy instruments.

Authority

  1. The Provost and Vice-President, Academic or successor thereof, is the Policy Owner and is responsible for overseeing the implementation, administration, and interpretation of this Policy.
  2. The Provost and Vice-President, Academic is responsible for establishing and overseeing procedural aspects and protocols related to Academic Integrity, Student conduct and the enforcement of Student discipline.
  3. The Faculty Deans, Registrar, and Dean of the School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies are responsible for ensuring that established protocols are carried out appropriately within their areas of responsibility, and for delegating responsibility for implementing procedures and carrying out inquiries of Allegations of Academic Misconduct.

Policy

STANDARDS OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Standards of Academic Integrity

  1. With relation to the teaching and learning relationship, students are expected to exhibit behaviours that promote and uphold a culture of Academic Integrity. These behaviours may include, but are not limited to:
    1. Completing one’s own work;
    2. Understanding and following the appropriate citation method in regard to the use of quotation marks and paraphrasing;
    3. Collaborating only when allowed by the instructor
    4. Acknowledging the contribution of others through proper citing/referencing (i.e., giving credit);
    5. Ensuring that one’s own work is not used by others unless approved by the instructor (e.g., group work);
    6. Acting ethically and with integrity while completing Academic Work, conducting research, and in the reporting of research results; and
    7. Following published Examination rules, instructions, and protocols.

Responsibilities

  1. All University Members are responsible for:
    1. fostering and maintaining a culture of Academic Integrity;
    2. familiarizing themselves with this Policy, related Procedures, and policy instruments;
    3. reporting incidents of suspected Academic Misconduct to the relevant authority;
    4. cooperating in the review of Allegations of Academic Misconduct as outlined by the Academic Misconduct Procedures;
    5. adhering to the values and principles of Academic Integrity in all Academic Activities.
  2. Academic Integrity Committees (including Faculty, Graduate and Admissions Academic Integrity Committees) are responsible for:
    1. conducting inquiries regarding Allegations of Academic Misconduct fairly as per the Academic Misconduct Procedures;
    2. ensuring the Student has a fair opportunity to review and respond to all Allegations, including any evidence under consideration;
    3. recommending a resolution to Allegations of Academic Misconduct heard by the Academic Integrity Committee to the appropriate Dean (or their Designate), or Registrar.
  3. The Academic Appeals Committee is responsible for:
    1. conducting hearings regarding appeals of violations of the standards of Academic Integrity after all formal processes have been exhausted at the faculty level, where new Evidence exists that was not reasonably available at the time of the original decision that, if considered, would likely have altered the outcome of the decision; and/or a Procedural Irregularity occurred in the original consideration of the case that affected the outcome of the decision.
  4. The Provost and Vice-President, Academic is responsible for:
    1. maintenance of the Academic Misconduct;
    2. reinforcing and modelling the University’s commitment to Academic Integrity and its fundamental values;
  5. The Provost and Vice-President, Academic’s designate is responsible for:
    1. disseminating information and resources that promote an atmosphere of Academic Integrity;
    2. providing access to education about Academic Integrity to all members of the University community.
  6. Faculty Deans, the Dean of the School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, and the Registrar are responsible for:
    1. Modelling behaviour consistent with Academic Integrity;
    2. reviewing recommendations of the Academic Integrity Committee and determining resolutions to Allegations of Academic Misconduct.
  7. Instructors and Research Supervisors are responsible for:
    1. detecting, investigating, and reporting suspected acts of Academic Misconduct;
    2. utilizing educational strategies that promote the values of Academic Integrity and encourage ethical and honest behaviour in Students;
    3. modelling behaviour consistent with Academic Integrity and its fundamental values;
    4. outlining expectations for academically honest behaviour at the beginning of the course, including information about referencing sources and appropriate collaboration;
    5. developing course outlines that clearly describe the expectations of Students regarding Academic Integrity;
    6. include information regarding the use of any phrase-matching software in their course outline and announce the use of this software during the first lecture of the course;
    7. providing links on the Learning Management System to information regarding Academic Integrity within the first week of classes.
  8. Teaching and research assistants are responsible for:
    1. detecting and reporting suspected acts of Academic Misconduct to the relevant Course Instructor;
    2. utilizing educational strategies that promote the values of Academic Integrity and encourage honest behaviours in Students;
    3. modelling behaviour consistent with Academic Integrity and its fundamental values;
    4. adhering to Academic Integrity and ethical behaviour expectations in research;
    5. following the expectations of Course Instructors about appropriate academic behaviour.
  9. Students (undergraduate and graduate) are responsible for:
    1. clarifying expectations with Course Instructors and Research Supervisors as needed;
    2. adhering to Academic Integrity and ethical behaviour expectations in research;
    3. taking reasonable precautions to protect their work from being used by others;
    4. following the expectations outlined by Course Instructors about appropriate academic behaviour.

Acts of Academic Misconduct

“Academic Misconduct” refers to activities, that may or may not be associated with a specific course, that violate the principles of Academic Integrity defined in this Policy.

The focus of Academic Integrity is on understanding and upholding the fundamental values of Academic Integrity rather than avoiding specific acts of Academic Misconduct. However, all University Members must have a consistent understanding and interpretation of what constitutes an act of Academic Misconduct as it relates to the enforcement of this Policy.

To ensure clarity, the University sets out categories and definitions of acts of Academic Misconduct. These are meant to provide a common set of terms so that University Members have a shared understanding about Academic Misconduct and can communicate effectively about Academic Misconduct. Categories are not mutually exclusive and should not be interpreted as an exhaustive list of possible acts or admissions of Academic Misconduct.

The following sections describe acts of Academic Misconduct:

Plagiarism and Improper Citation

  1. Plagiarism is presenting another person’s intellectual property as your own. Plagiarism can be intentional (i.e., a deliberate act) or unintentional. It is possible to “self-plagiarize. “This involves submitting your work from one course to another without permission of the instructor. This constitutes an act of academic misconduct.
  2. Intellectual property includes, but is not limited to ideas, wording, images/photographs, artwork, designs, lecture slides, code, music, videos, audio and digital files, articles, essays, research, lab results, computer software, Internet resources, and other works.
  3. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to:
    • Submitting someone else’s work, in whole or in part, as one’s own.
    • Including quotes from others without appropriate citations, reference, and/or indication of verbatim phrases with the appropriate use of quotation marks.
    • Closely paraphrasing another’s work without citation and/or reference.
    • Submitting work done in collaboration with others as one’s own without acknowledgement of the contributions of others.
  4. Reusing work previously submitted for a course or published without proper citation or reference, or permission of the current instructor. Self-plagiarism can include presenting the paper in whole or in part for assessment
  5. Improper citation and reference: purposely dishonest or inappropriate citation (e.g., in the body of the paper) and/or reference (e.g., at the end of the document).
  6. Improper citation and reference include, but is not limited to:
    1. Bibliography or reference list padding (e.g., including works that were not considered).
    2. Citing a false source (e.g., citing a non-existent source).
    3. Neglecting to cite your own previous work where citation would be considered appropriate for any other source.
  7. Examples of improper citation include, but are not limited to:
    • Citing and/or referencing of materials not used in the creation of the Academic Work;
    • Citing and/or referencing a primary source or originating article when the primary or originating article was not accessed (e.g., original work cited in another source but presented as if it had been consulted/used);
    • Citing and/or referencing fictitious materials in Academic Work;
    • Incorrectly attributing material to an author when it belongs to a different author;
    • Neglecting to cite one’s own previous work.

Cheating

  1. Cheating refers to any deceptive action whereby a Student misrepresents their mastery of information necessary to complete Academic Work.
  2. Cheating includes, but is not limited to:
    1. Unauthorized collaboration.
    2. Possession of unauthorized aids.
    3. Consultation with an unauthorized person during a test, Examination, or other evaluation.
    4. Copying another’s work.
    5. Submitting another’s work as one’s own.
    6. Unauthorized resubmission of work.
    7. Submission of work when a major portion has been previously submitted or is being submitted for another course, without the expressed permission of all instructors involved.
    8. Preparing, buying, selling, accepting, or giving away Academic Work, in whole or in part, with the expectation that these works will be submitted, in whole or in part, by a Student(s) other than the author for the purposes of grading.
    9. Violation of the Procedures for Final Examination Administration.
  3. Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to:
    • Copying another’s Academic Work, test, Examination, or other evaluation;
    • Contract cheating;
    • Collusion;
    • Allowing a third party to edit and/or alter a take-home test, examination, or other evaluation without the expressed permission of the Course Instructor or otherwise implicitly implied (e.g., Student Accessibility Services, Writing Centre);
    • Accessing an electronic device (e.g., cell phone, ear buds, smart watch/glasses), regardless of the reason, during a test, Examination, or other evaluation without the expressed permission of the Course Instructor;
    • Accessing unauthorized Internet or hardcopy sources during a test, Examination, or other evaluation;
    • Violating the Procedures for Final Examination Administration.

Falsification and Misrepresentation

  1. Falsification: altering or modifying a genuine document or creating a false document for the purpose of misleading or deceiving.
  2. Misrepresentation: giving a false or misleading account, verbally or otherwise, including through the omission of relevant information or documentation.
  3. Misrepresentation and falsification include, but are not limited to:
    1. Impersonating another Student or allowing oneself to be impersonated for purposes of taking Examinations or carrying out laboratory or other Academic Activities.
    2. Falsifying academic records, including tests and Examinations, or submitting false credentials for purpose of gaining admission to a program, course, placement, or internship or for any other purpose.
    3. Misrepresentation of facts, whether written or oral, which may have an effect on academic evaluation. This includes making fraudulent health claims, obtaining medical or other certificates under false pretences, or altering certificates for the purpose of misrepresentation.
    4. Fabrication or falsification of information, citation, data, or result excluding honest error, conflicting data, or difference in interpretation.
    5. Providing a false record (example: signature) for attendance or on any document related to the submission of Academic Work where the signature is used as proof of authenticity or participation in an Academic Activity.
    6. Withholding documentation and/or relevant information to mislead or gain an unfair and unearned advantage.
    7. Resubmission of altered Academic Work after it has already been evaluated.
  4. Examples of misrepresentation and falsification include, but are not limited to:
    • Altering a genuine Medical Statement or creating a false Medical Statement to support an academic appeal and/or application;
    • Giving false information (example: symptoms) for the purposes of obtaining a Medical Statement from a physician;
    • Falsifying a University transcript, certificate, and/or degree parchment;
    • Altering a grade recorded on an evaluated piece of Academic Work and requesting the grade to be changed;
    • Altering or creating false research or lab data;
    • Having someone impersonate one’s self during an examination;
    • Omitting relevant information from an appeal and/or application for the purpose of improving the possibility that the appeal and/or application will be granted.

Improper Access and Improper Dissemination

  1. Improper access: improperly obtaining confidential and/or copyrighted information and/or documents to gain an unfair and unearned advantage in Academic Work.
  2. Improper dissemination: posting, publishing, giving away, selling, or otherwise making public information, documents, or data that involved the work of others without their expressed permission and/or where it ought to be reasonably assumed that the information is confidential and/or copyrighted.
  3. Improper access and improper dissemination include, but are not limited to:
    1. Obtaining Examination papers, tests, or similar materials by improper means and/or use or distribution of such materials to others.
    2. Unauthorized dissemination of copyrighted work and documents.
    3. Preparing, buying, selling, accepting, or giving away Academic Work, in whole or in part, with the expectation that these works will be submitted, in whole or in part, by another Student(s) for the purposes of grading.
    4. Abuse of confidentiality: sharing unpublished data or drafts of articles for publication without the expressed permission of the author(s).
    5. Examples of improper access and improper dissemination include, but are not limited to:
      • Posting slides, lecture notes, assignments/Coursework, tests/Examinations, and other documents prepared by a Course Instructor on a note sharing site without their expressed permission;
      • Obtaining a copy of an answer key, test, examination, or other Academic Work by improper means (e.g., computer hacking).

Improper Research Practices

  1. Improper Research Practices: dishonest acts committed in the pursuit of completing research that result in an unfair and unearned academic advantage.
  2. Improper Research Practices include, but are not limited to:
    1. Violation of health and safety regulations in a laboratory or other setting.
    2. Deliberate destruction of or tampering with one's own or another's research data, human or animal research subjects, or other Academic Work related to research.
    3. Failure to comply with University policy, relevant federal or provincial statutes or regulations for the protection of researchers, human participants or the health and safety of the public welfare of animals.
    4. Fabrication or falsification of information, citation, data, or result excluding honest error, conflicting data, or difference in interpretation.
  3. Examples of improper research practices include, but are not limited to:
    • Attending a laboratory while intoxicated;
    • Falsifying research/experiment data;
    • Altering experiment results.

Obstruction and Interference

  1. Obstruction: preventing another’s progress or the progress of one’s self in Academic Work through improper means (e.g., not in compliance with accept standards).
  2. Interference: committing acts that impede or hinder another’s progress or the progress of one’s self in their own Academic Work through improper means.
  3. Obstruction and interference include, but are not limited to:
    1. Unreasonable infringement on the freedom of other members of the academic community (e.g., disrupting Examinations, harassing, intimidating, or threatening others).
    2. Deliberate destruction of or tampering with one's own or another's research data, human or animal research subjects, or other Academic Work.
    3. Removing, altering, misusing, or destroying University property to obstruct the Academic Work of others or one’s self.
  4. Examples of obstruction and interference include, but are not limited to:
    • Removing pages from library materials thereby preventing access of these materials by other Students.
    • Tampering with lab equipment for the purpose of gaining an extension on a lab report or research project;
    • Alter the academic work or experiment results of another without their knowledge and/or consent.

Assisting in the Violation of the Standards of Academic Integrity

  1. Assisting in the violation of the standards of Academic Integrity: knowingly aiding and abetting others in an act of Academic Misconduct. This includes acts or omissions where an individual ought reasonably to have known they were assisting in a violation.
  2. Assisting in the violation of the standards of Academic Integrity includes, but is not limited to:
    1. Allowing one's own Academic Work to be copied.
    2. Failing to take precautions, reasonable in the circumstances, to protect Academic Work from being used inappropriately by other Students.
    3. Preparing, selling, or giving away Academic Work, in whole or in part, with the expectation that another Student will submit these works, in whole or in part, for the purposes of grading.
  3. Examples of assisting in the violation of the standards of Academic Integrity include, but are not limited to:
    • Giving another Student a completed assignment, either in whole or in part, with or without the intention for the recipient to copy the material.
    • Signing an attendance sheet used for the purposes of tracking attendance and/or participation for a Student other than one’s self.

Other

  1. Other dishonest acts that cannot be categorized as plagiarism and improper citation, cheating, falsification and misrepresentation, improper access and improper dissemination, improper research practices, obstruction and interference, or assisting in the violation of the standards of Academic Integrity, that result or could result in an unfair and unearned academic advantage.
  2. Other acts of Academic Misconduct include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any unlisted act that does not uphold the fundamental values of Academic Integrity.
    2. Attempting to commit a listed or unlisted act of Academic Misconduct.
ALLEGATIONS OF ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

Allegations of Academic Misconduct

  1. The Office of the Provost will set out detailed Procedures to address Allegations of Academic Misconduct. The principles of administrative fairness and the University’s Fair Processes Policy will guide the Procedures.
  2. Where an Allegation of Academic Misconduct involves more than one Student (e.g., group work), each Student represents an individual Allegation of Academic Misconduct. Each Student will be met with individually in determine the facts surrounding the Allegation.
SANCTIONS FOR ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

Sanctions for Academic Misconduct

  1. Under this Policy, Students found to have engaged in an act of Academic Misconduct may have one or more of the following sanctions imposed upon them. Sanctions include, but are not limited to the following:
    1. Penalties identified by the instructor in the course syllabus;
    2. Written reprimand;
    3. Resubmission of the piece of Academic Work with the potential of a reduction in grade
    4. Mandatory participation in an educational activity (e.g., Academic Integrity Tutorial);
    5. Remedial Academic Activity that is comparable to, but does not exceed, the level of work entailed in the initial assignment or activity;
    6. Submission of a failing grade for the Academic Work;
    7. Submission of a failing grade for the course;
    8. Submission of a failing grade for the course with a notation on the Student’s official transcript;
    9. Disciplinary probation for a period not less than one (1) term (fall or winter) and up to the remainder of the Student’s registration in their current level of study as deemed appropriate;
    10. Restraining orders or monetary restitution where appropriate in the case of threats, harassment, or damage to property;
    11. Suspension from attendance in a course, a program, a Faculty, or the University, for a period not less than one (1) term (fall or winter) and not exceeding three (3) years as deemed appropriate with a notation on theStudent’s official transcript. The conditions of Suspension will specify the length of time such notice will remain on the Student’s transcript. 
    12. Permanent dismissal from a program, a Faculty, or the University with a notation on the Student’s official transcript;
    13. Expunging of grades or revoking of degrees with a notation on the Student’s official transcript;
    14. Other such sanctions as deemed appropriate.
  2. The severity of the sanction(s) will consider contextual factors, including but not limited to:
    1. the nature of the offence;
    2. the Student’s past record of academic conduct;
    3. the level of responsibility taken by the Student;
    4. the level of the Student’s intent;
    5. the level of the Student’s academic experience;
    6. aggravating and mitigating factors;
    7. whether the work is considered a major milestone for the Student’s program (examples: capstone, thesis, major project); and
    8. other relevant considerations as deemed appropriate.
  3. Sanctions should take into consideration the balance between education and disciplinary measures as often as possible.
  4. Students responsible for committing successive acts of Academic Misconduct will receive increasingly severe sanctions.
  5. In the event of non-compliance with a sanction that requires the Student’s participation, an appropriate alternative sanction that does not require the Student’s cooperation will be enforced.
  6. Where a sanction includes submission of a failing grade for a course, the Student will not be permitted to withdraw from the course and no tuition refund will be granted.
  7. Where the sanction imposed involves a specified period where a Student cannot register for courses at the University, courses taken elsewhere during this specified period are not eligible for transfer credit.

Transcript notations

  1. Transcript notations for Academic Misconduct will include the following range of notations:
    1. grade of F assigned for [course number] for academic misconduct;
    2. suspended for academic misconduct for [dates of suspension]; and
    3. permanently dismissed for academic misconduct;
  2. Transcript notations will normally be recorded on the Student’s academic transcript for a minimum of two (2) years.
    1. A student may apply to the Academic Appeals Committee to have a notice of suspension and/or transcription notation expunged from their academic record after a minimum of two (2) years from the last recorded act of Academic Misconduct. If the appeal is granted, the Office of the Registrar will be notified to remove the notification.
  3. Transcript notations for students who are suspended or permanently dismissed for Academic Misconduct will remain on their academic record and cannot be appealed.

Monitoring and Review

This Policy will be reviewed as necessary and at least every three year. The Provost and Vice-President, Academic, or successor thereof, is responsible to monitor and review this Policy.

Relevant Legislation

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Related Policies, Procedures & Documents

Academic Misconduct Procedures
Directives for the Appropriate Use of Phrase-Matching Software
Fair Processes Policy
Student Conduct Policy
Health and Safety Policy
Procedures for Final Examination Administration
Research Ethics Policy
Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship Policy and Procedures
Care and Use of Animals in Research and Teaching
Conflict of Interest in Research

 

End Notes

Acknowledgements: The University of Ontario Institute of Technology recognizes the following institutions, whose related policies served as a foundation in the development of this Policy: Brock University, Carleton University, McMaster University, Ryerson University, the University of Toronto, the University of Windsor, and the International Center for Academic Integrity.